Traveling Light for Women

Eva’s List: Traveling Light for Women

Source: http://zenhabits.net/evas-list/
Post written by Leo Babauta and Eva Babauta.

When I wrote my 16 Essential Tips for Traveling with a Familya couple weeks ago, I had a ton of people ask the same thing: “I’d like to see Eva’s packing list!”

There’s an idea, it seems, that it’s much easier for a man to pack lightly than a woman. And while there’s some truth to that, I think it’s a matter of changing long-held ideas of what you need when you travel.

Luckily, we have my wife Eva to tell us what she packed, and what the experience was like for her. This is her first post on Zen Habits, and I’m happy to have her join me here.

Some context: Eva and I took five of our kids on a 3-week trip across southern Europe, in Rome, Florence, Bologna, Cinque Terre, the French Riviera (Antibes), and Barcelona. We brought only a small backpack each (no luggage, no roller carry-ons), and found the experience to be great.

Eva hasn’t always packed this lightly. She used to need a heavier carry-on duffle bag that I would usually end up lugging around for her (we have never traveled with big suitcases since we started traveling in 2008). But on those trips, she would begin to realize that there were a lot of things she brought that she really didn’t use or need, and slowly she has radically changed the way she packs, to my everlasting delight.

Small note: Eva & I share a toothbrush & toothpaste, both of which were in my backpack.

And now, let me turn it over to Eva:

Eva’s Packing List

By Eva Babauta

I definitely did not travel as lightly as Leo did. But, I think that I did a pretty good job of traveling light.

Here’s my packing list, carried in one backpack.

In my 15-inch packing folder were:

In a small pouch I had travel size toiletries:

  • facial wash
  • moisturizer
  • contact solution and lenses
  • deodorant

I also packed:

  • a pair of shades
  • a book
  • my iPod shuffle and earbuds
  • camera with battery charger

When we left San Francisco I wore:

  • jeans
  • a tank
  • a light jacket/hoodie
  • my New Balance Minimus shoes — very comfortable and good for walking running and light hiking

While in Europe I realized that I really didn’t need the jacket I wore or the extra pair of pants that I packed so I left them behind in one of the apartments.

I was very happy that we were each all able to travel with just one small bag and it saved me the trouble of having to keep track of extra luggage and the added stress of standing around at baggage claim. We made it through customs easily and avoided the long lines because of this.

I realized that it’s OK to wear the same things over and over again. No one cares what you are wearing. They’re too busy having a good time to even notice.

Having a big family means lots and lots of dirty laundry. I am so thankful that our kids agreed to minimal packing. They each packed three t-shirts and one extra pair of shorts/jeans. It made washing and folding so easy.

Packing lightly means that everyone (including the little ones) can be responsible for their own things. Our little ones (6 and 8 years old) did a very good job of repacking when it was time to leave one city to go to the next. They were able to carry theirtiny backpacks the whole trip without being tired. We each packed for ourselves and I didn’t have to pack anything extra in my bag or carry theirs.

Things I used to pack which I now realize I don’t need:

  • Hair straightener and product — I simply tie my hair in a bun which is perfect when it’s so hot.
  • Lotions shampoo conditioner toothpaste — just buy some when you get to your destination. They don’t have to be the brand you’re used to.
  • Extra pairs of shoes — find a pair that is comfortable and can be used for everything.
  • Fancy clothes/shoes — no need to pack these. You can buy a nice dress and pair of shoes if you decide that you’d like to go somewhere fancy otherwise there is no need.
  • Baby wipes or hand sanitizer — grab an extra napkin when you eat out and shove it in your pocket for later.

 

 

POSTED: 08.04.2012

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BBQ Essential

BBQ Essential

BBQ gears

  1. Charcoal:  Kingsford Matchlight
  2. Charcoal grill portable
  3. Lighter
  4. Tongs (do gap): at least 2
  5. Brushes made of metal (to clean the grill and scrap off the charcoal)  and soft brush (to brush sauces on the meat)
  6. Grill rack (to put on top of the grill to grill meat)
  7. Skewers (cai xieng) optional
  8. Lots of news paper
  9. Table cloths (optional)
  10. Sanitizer (optional)
  11. Aluminum paper.
  12. A bowl of oil.

Storage

  1. Ice storage
  2. Tongs

Disposable utensils

  1. Plate à nha chi con 1 it
  2. Fork
  3. Cups
  4. Napkins à nha chi con 1 it.
  5. Trash bags
  6. Big trays to put meat cooked and uncooked and fruit.

Korean BBQ Beef

  1. Short rib beef
  2. BBQ Sauce: Chung Jung One Gaibi Sauce & Marinade for beef
  3. Honey (optional)
  4. Lemon grass (optional)
  5. Salt, sugar, seasoning powder
  6. Asparagus (optional)
  7. Kimchi

How to prepare: marinade beef with salt, sugar, honey, lemon grass and BBQ Sauce for 3-8 hours in the fridge. Grill open flame.

Chicken wings

  1. Frozen chicken wings
  2. Soya sauce (optional)
  3. Honey (optional)
  4. Salt, sugar, seasoning powder

How to prepare: cut into 2 pieces, marinade with a little seasoning powder, salt and sugar. If want to make it taste better, put in honey and soya sauce and a little bit oyster sauce.

Seafood Skews

  1. Shrimp
  2. Pork (optional)
  3. Onion
  4. Pepper

How to prepare: shrimp removed head, season with salt, sugar, seasoning powder and fresh minced chili. Skew with onion and pepper.

Dessert & Drinks

  1. Fruits: suggested fruits that do not need to peel such as strawberry, apples, pears, or water melon.
  2. Juices
  3. Plain water
  4. Ice
  5. Beer (optional)

BBQ Essentials

BBQ Essential

BBQ gears

  1. Charcoal:  Kingsford Matchlight
  2. Charcoal grill portable
  3. Lighter
  4. Tongs (do gap): at least 2
  5. Brushes made of metal (to clean the grill and scrap off the charcoal)  and soft brush (to brush sauces on the meat)
  6. Grill rack (to put on top of the grill to grill meat)
  7. Skewers (cai xieng) optional
  8. Lots of news paper
  9. Table cloths (optional)
  10. Sanitizer (optional)

Storage

  1. Ice storage
  2. Tongs

Disposable utensils

  1. Plate à nha chi con 1 it
  2. Fork
  3. Cups
  4. Napkins à nha chi con 1 it.
  5. Trash bags
  6. Big trays to put meat cooked and uncooked and fruit.

Korean BBQ Beef

  1. Short rib beef
  2. BBQ Sauce: Chung Jung One Gaibi Sauce & Marinade for beef
  3. Honey (optional)
  4. Lemon grass (optional)
  5. Salt, sugar, seasoning powder
  6. Asparagus (optional)
  7. Kimchi

How to prepare: marinade beef with salt, sugar, honey, lemon grass and BBQ Sauce for 3-8 hours in the fridge. Grill open flame.

Chicken wings

  1. Frozen chicken wings
  2. Soya sauce (optional)
  3. Honey (optional)
  4. Salt, sugar, seasoning powder

How to prepare: cut into 2 pieces, marinade with a little seasoning powder, salt and sugar. If want to make it taste better, put in honey and soya sauce and a little bit oyster sauce.

Seafood Skews

  1. Shrimp
  2. Pork (optional)
  3. Onion
  4. Pepper

How to prepare: shrimp removed head, season with salt, sugar, seasoning powder and fresh minced chili. Skew with onion and pepper.

Dessert & Drinks

  1. Fruits: suggested fruits that do not need to peel such as strawberry, apples, pears, or water melon.
  2. Juices
  3. Plain water
  4. Ice
  5. Beer (optional)

The Credit Illusion

The New York Times

 


August 2, 2012
 The Credit Illusion

By 

Dear Mr. Opinion Guy,

Over the past few years, I’ve built a successful business. I’ve worked hard, and I’m proud of what I’ve done. But now President Obama tells me that social and political forces helped build that. Mitt Romney went to Israel and said cultural forces explain the differences in the wealth of nations. I’m confused. How much of my success is me, and how much of my success comes from forces outside of me?

Confused in Columbus.

Dear Confused,

This is an excellent question. It has no definitive answer. There were many different chefs of the stew that is you: parents, friends, teachers, ancestors, mentors and, of course, Oprah Winfrey. It’s very hard to know how much of your success is owed to those people and how much is owed to yourself. As a wise man once said, what God hath woven together, even multiple regression analysis cannot tear asunder.

Nonetheless, this question does have a practical and a moral answer. It is this: You should regard yourself as the sole author of all your future achievements and as the grateful beneficiary of all your past successes.

As you go through life, you should pass through different phases in thinking about how much credit you deserve. You should start your life with the illusion that you are completely in control of what you do. You should finish life with the recognition that, all in all, you got better than you deserved.

In your 20s, for example, you should regard yourself as an Ayn Randian Superman who is the architect of the wonder that is you. This is the last time in your life that you will find yourself truly fascinating, so you might as well take advantage of it. You should imagine that you have the power to totally transform yourself, to go from the pathetic characters on “Girls” to the awesome and confident persona of someone like Jay-Z.

This sense of possibility will unleash feverish energies that will propel you forward. You’ll be one of those people who joined every club in high school, started a side business while in college and spent the years after graduation bravely doing entrepreneurial social work across the developing world.

This may not make you sympathetic when it comes to other people’s failures (as everybody’s Twitter feed can attest), but it will give you liftoff velocity in the race of life.

In your 30s and 40s, you will begin to think like a political scientist. You’ll have a lower estimation of your own power and a greater estimation of the power of the institutions you happen to be in.

You’ll still have faith in your own skills, but it will be more the skills of navigation, not creation. You’ll adapt to the rules and peculiarities of your environment. You’ll keep up with what the essayist Joseph Epstein calls “the current snobberies.” You’ll understand that the crucial question isn’t what you want, but what the market wants. For a brief period, you won’t mind breakfast meetings.

Then in your 50s and 60s, you will become a sociologist, understanding that relationships are more powerful than individuals. The higher up a person gets, the more time that person devotes to scheduling and personnel. As a manager, you will find yourself in the coaching phase of life, enjoying the dreams of your underlings. Ambition, like promiscuity, is most pleasant when experienced vicariously.

You’ll find yourself thinking back to your own mentors, newly aware of how much they shaped your path. Even though the emotions of middle-aged people are kind of ridiculous, you’ll get sentimental about the relationships you benefited from and the ones you are building. Steve Jobs said his greatest accomplishment was building a company, not a product.

Then in your 70s and 80s, you’ll be like an ancient historian. Your mind will bob over the decades and then back over the centuries, and you’ll realize how deeply you were formed by the ancient traditions of your people — being Mormon or Jewish or black or Hispanic. You’ll appreciate how much power the dead have over the living, since this will one day be your only power. You’ll be struck by the astonishing importance of luck — the fact that you took this bus and not another, met this person and not another.

In short, as maturity develops and the perspectives widen, the smaller the power of the individual appears, and the greater the power of those forces flowing through the individual.

But you, Mr. Confused in Columbus, are right to preserve your pride in your accomplishments. Great companies, charities and nations were built by groups of individuals who each vastly overestimated their own autonomy. As an ambitious executive, it’s important that you believe that you will deserve credit for everything you achieve. As a human being, it’s important for you to know that’s nonsense.

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Basic Color Theory

Source: http://www.tigercolor.com/color-lab/color-theory/color-theory-intro.htm

Colors affect us in numerous ways, both mentally and physically. A strong red color has been shown to raise the blood pressure, while a blue color has a calming effect.

Being able to use colors consciously and harmoniously can help you create spectacular results.

The Color Wheel

Color wheel

The color wheel or color circle is the basic tool for combining colors. The first circular color diagram was designed by Sir Isaac Newton in 1666.

The color wheel is designed so that virtually any colors you pick from it will look good together. Over the years, many variations of the basic design have been made, but the most common version is a wheel of 12 colors based on the RYB (or artistic) color model.

Traditionally, there are a number of color combinations that are considered especially pleasing. These are called color harmonies or color chords and they consist of two or more colors with a fixed relation in the color wheel.

ColorImpact is designed to dynamically create a color wheel to match your base color.

Primary, Secondary and Tertiary Colors

In the RYB (or subtractive) color model, the primary colors are red, yellow and blue.

The three secondary colors (green, orange and purple) are created by mixing two primary colors.

Another six tertiary colors are created by mixing primary and secondary colors.

The above illustration shows the color circle with the primary, secondary and tertiary colors. Click on the labels to turn the colors on / off.

Warm and cool colorsWarm and cool colors

The color circle can be divided into warm and cool colors.

Warm colors are vivid and energetic, and tend to advance in space.

Cool colors give an impression of calm, and create a soothing impression.

White, black and gray are considered to be neutral.

Tints, Shades, and Tones

These terms are often used incorrectly, although they describe fairly simple color concepts. If a color is made lighter by adding white, the result is called a tint. If black is added, the darker version is called a shade. And if gray is added, the result is a different tone.

Tints – adding white to a pure hue:

tints


Shades – adding black to a pure hue:

Shades


Tones – adding gray to a pure hue:

Tones


Color Harmonies
– basic techniques for creating color schemes

Below are shown the basic color chords based on the color wheel.


complementary Complementary color scheme
Colors that are opposite each other on the color wheel are considered to be complementary colors (example: red and green).

The high contrast of complementary colors creates a vibrant look especially when used at full saturation. This color scheme must be managed well so it is not jarring.

Complementary color schemes are tricky to use in large doses, but work well when you want something to stand out.

Complementary colors are really bad for text.

complementary scheme


analogous Analogous color scheme
Analogous color schemes use colors that are next to each other on the color wheel. They usually match well and create serene and comfortable designs.

Analogous color schemes are often found in nature and are harmonious and pleasing to the eye.

Make sure you have enough contrast when choosing an analogous color scheme.

Choose one color to dominate, a second to support. The third color is used (along with black, white or gray) as an accent.
analogous scheme


triad Triadic color scheme 
A triadic color scheme uses colors that are evenly spaced around the color wheel.

Triadic color schemes tend to be quite vibrant, even if you use pale or unsaturated versions of your hues.

To use a triadic harmony successfully, the colors should be carefully balanced – let one color dominate and use the two others for accent.

triadic scheme


split-complementary Split-Complementary color scheme 
The split-complementary color scheme is a variation of the complementary color scheme. In addition to the base color, it uses the two colors adjacent to its complement.

This color scheme has the same strong visual contrast as the complementary color scheme, but has less tension.

The split-complimentary color scheme is often a good choice for beginners, because it is difficult to mess up.

split-complementary scheme


Rectangle (tetradic) color scheme 
The rectangle or tetradic color scheme uses four colors arranged into two complementary pairs.

This rich color scheme offers plenty of possibilities for variation.

Tetradic color schemes works best if you let one color be dominant.

You should also pay attention to the balance between warm and cool colors in your design.

rectangle scheme


square Square color scheme 
The square color scheme is similar to the rectangle, but with all four colors spaced evenly around the color circle.

Square color schemes works best if you let one color be dominant.

You should also pay attention to the balance between warm and cool colors in your design.

square scheme

Fashion tip

-Body shape: inverted triangle, or apple shaped, petite, big upper body
– how to wear: accentuate waist, reduce bust, enhance hip.
– what to avoid:

  • print bigger than your fist
  • tube
  • Ankle strap shoes
  • belt at the belly.
  • tops that end at your hip bones.

– What is preferred:

  • one color, warm tone
  • petite, vintage
  • interesting upper body to draw attention away from the belly. Wear tops that draw attention away from your legs: V-necks, small shoulder blouse, bright colors, neck-line.
  • dress is preferred to skirt (not to make a broken line)
  • flare, A-line, V-neck, wrap dress, mid-rise, dark color top, bright color bottom, Jean straight cut, mid rise,
  • High-waist, empire
  • Platform

– what to wear :

  • Underwear: right size bra, slimming underwear
  •  Accessories : low rise belt, just below breast, not at the belly
  • Swim wear: one piece
  • Skirt: A line skirt, flare skirt, do not stop at the biggest part of the body. Length: slightly above knee or angle length. zip at the side or the back (draw attention away from your belly).
  • Shoes: platform, no angle straps
  • Pant: -Wide-leg pants: cover your shoes. No crop pants (lat lai).  low-waist –> not stop at the biggest part of your belly.
  • Jean: mid-rise, slight curvy, boot cut, dark color, no wash, with pocket, pointed downward, the rear is rear is higher than the front, embracing your butt.
  • Jacket: empire, smallest right below breast, flare, and leave them unbuttoned, sleeve end at your finger tips when arms are at your side
  • Top: no top shorter than your hip bones, no big print, no tube, wear camisole if the top is not long enough to cover the intersection of your pants.
  • Belt: just below breast, not at the belly

How to make you look thinner:

– Grey is better than black
– Horizontal print makes you look thinner.
– It is OK to mix print and patterns. Don’t mix with more than 2 colors.
– Blue navy can go with green, brown can go with black.

Source: http://www.howcast.com/videos/241656-How-to-Dress-If-Youre-a-Short-Woman

How to avoid muffin top

– Wear well-fitted pants. Wear mid-rise, enough room, just at the waist line
– Wear camisole to cover your section if the top is not long enough
– Wear skirts with bigger waist bands.

Source: http://www.howcast.com/videos/310599-How-to-Avoid-Muffin-Top

Perfect wardrobe:

– Little black dress (just make sure it’s a solid color) + simple elegant shoes
– Plain dark jeans (no fade) that can wear up and down.
– Crisp, white button-down shirt
– Black all-season pants that can wear with sweater, jacket or shirt, blouse,
– White T-shirts: V-neck, U-neck, long and short sleeves
– Black skirt: knee-length, A-line
– Trench coat